Special Issue on Misinformation; Call for Papers

June 29th, 2020 by

EUNOMIA’s Ioannis Katakis along with Karl Aberer (EPFL), Quoc Viet Hung Nguyen (Griffith University) and Hongzhi Yin (The University of Queensland) are editing a special issue on misinformation on the web that will be published in the Journal of Information Systems, one of the top-tier journals in Databases and Data-Driven Applications. This special issue seeks high-quality and original papers that advance the concepts, methods, and theories of misinformation detection as well as address the mechanisms, strategies and techniques for misinformation interventions. Topics include:

  • Fake news, social bots, misinformation, and disinformation on social data
  • Misinformation, opinion dynamics and polarization in social data
  • Online misbehavior (scams, deception, and click-bait) and its relation to misinformation
  • Information/Misinformation diffusion
  • Credibility and reputation of news sources, social data, and crowdsourced data

and many more.


The timeline of the special issue is the following:

Submission: 1st August 2020

First Round Notification: 1st October 2020

First Round Revisions: 1st December 2020

Second Round Notification: 1st February 2021

Final Submission: 1st March 2021

Publication: second quarter, 2021Please find more information or submit your paper here:
https://www.journals.elsevier.com/information-systems/call-for-papers/special-issue-on-misinformation-on-the-web
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Challenging Misinformation: Exploring Limits and Approaches

June 23rd, 2020 by

We invite researchers and practitioners interested in aligning social, computational and technological approaches to mitigating the challenge of misinformation in social media to join us at the SocInfo 2020 Workshop!

The last weeks and months of the COVID-19 pandemic have shown quite drastically how access to accurate information is crucial. So many rumours, hoaxes, fake news and other forms of dis- and misinformation have been spread that the term ‘infodemic’ was coined. To counteract this wicked problem, tools and online services are continuously being developed to support different stakeholders. However, limiting the harm caused by misinformation requires merging multiple perspectives, including an understanding of human behaviour in judging and promoting false information, as well as technical solutions to detect and stop its propagation. To this point, all the solutions are notably limited: as a multi-layered problem, there is not a single and comprehensive solution capable of stopping misinformation. Existing approaches are all limited for different reasons: the way end-users are (or not) engaged, limited data sources, subjectivity associated with the judgment, etc. Furthermore, purely technical solutions tend to disregard the social structures that lead to the spread of misinformation, or the different ways societal groups are affected are not only limited, they can also be harmful by obfuscating the problem. Therefore, a comprehensive and interdisciplinary approach is needed.

So, how can we battle misinformation and flatten the curve of the infodemic? Members of the EU funded projects Co-inform and EUNOMIA have joined forces to organise a hands-on workshop at the SocInfo conference on 6 October 2020. Aim of the workshop is to unpack the state-of-the-art on social sciences and technical solutions, challenging the participants to critically reflect upon existing limitations and then co-create a future with integrating perspectives. This workshop intends to bring together data scientists, media specialists, computer scientists, social scientists, designers, and journalists. Participants are invited to discuss challenges and obstacles related to misinformation online from human and technical perspectives; to challenge existing approaches and identify their limitations in technical terms and targeted users, and to co-create future scenarios building on existing solutions.

Find out more

About the workshop, topics of interest, the submission process, and the organisers: http://events.kmi.open.ac.uk/misinformation/

About SocInfo 2020: https://kdd.isti.cnr.it/socinfo2020/

About Co-inform: https://coinform.eu/

Workshop: Fighting fake news. Ways to enhance accountability, reliability and accuracy of Social Media information

March 31st, 2020 by

Workshop: Fighting fake news. Ways to enhance accountability, reliability and accuracy of Social Media information

Call for Papers

During the last decade, there has been a revolution in how people interconnect and socialize. From the early days of Facebook to today’s proliferation of Social Media of all types, people have been embracing this new form of socialization. Social networks, media and platforms are becoming the primary way in how our societies operate for the purposes of communication, information exchange, conducting business, co-creation, and learning. However, their extreme growth in combination with the lack of control over the digital content being published and shared, has led to their information veracity being heavily disputed.

As blatant fake news cases are becoming countless, motives for their spreading are often financial or political. In a recent letter, Sir Tim Berners-Lee, the inventor of the World Wide Web, specifically points out the alarming situation where most people today find news and information on the web through just a handful of social media sites and search engines. These sites use fake news as a tool to artificially grow their traffic, in order to take advantage of increased advertising revenues. They choose what to show based on algorithms that learn from our personal data, which they are constantly harvesting. The net result is that these sites show content they think we will click on –meaning that misinformation or fake news which is surprising, shocking, or designed to appeal to our biases, spread quickly. In the Freedom of the Net 2017 report, Freedom House is led to the same conclusion. The report studied 65 countries worldwide between June 2016 and May 2017 and found out that online manipulation and disinformation tactics played an important role in elections in at least 18 out of 65 countries during this period, including the United States.

Establishing synergies with innovative information and communication technologies (such as semantic analysis tools, blockchains, emotional descriptors, machine learning) can enhance the accountability, reliability and accuracy of the information being shared in Social Media, leading to a more veritable sociality. Key to this situation is to safeguard the distributed and open nature of Social Media, strengthening pluralism and participation, and mitigating censorship. At the same time, what is and what is not fake news is rarely straightforward. Users cannot leave such decisions to third parties like fact checkers or computer algorithms. A more mature approach to evaluating themselves and sharing information they read online can dramatically halt the main advantage of fake news, which is their speed of spreading.

In the context of the above, this workshop invites papers in the areas of:

  • innovative ICT technologies to fight against spreading of fake news
  • digital content verification
  • distributed trust and reputation establishment in decentralized environments
  • the role of machine learning both in causing and in tackling disinformation online
  • blockchain technologies to support accountability and transparency
  • human factors in social media disinformation
  • involvement of media specialists and user communities in the content verification process
  • ethics in social media disinformation
  • information veracity in the web and social media ecosystems

The workshop is co-organized by the H2020 EUNOMIA project and the H2020 SocialTruth project.

Workshop organizers:

Dr. Konstantinos Demestichas, ICCS/NTUA, Athens, Greece, email: cdemest@cn.ntua.gr

Prof. George Loukas, University of Greenwich, UK, email: g.loukas@gre.ac.uk  

Prof. Charalampos Z. Patrikakis, University of West Attica, email: bpatr@uniwa.gr

Dr. Evgenia Adamopoulou, Hellenic Open University, Patras, Greece, email: evgenia.adamopoulou@ac.eap.gr

Important Dates

Full paper submission deadline: 18 August 2019

Notification of decision: 14 September 2019

Camera-ready deadline: 22 September 2019

Instructions for Authors

Submitted papers must not substantially overlap with papers that have been published or that have been submitted to a journal or a conference with proceedings. Papers should be at most 15 pages long, including the bibliography and well-marked appendices, and should follow the LNCS style (https://www.springer.com/gp/computer-science/lncs/conference-proceedings-guidelines). Submissions are to be made to the submission web site at https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=edemocracy2019. Only pdf files will be accepted. Submissions not meeting these guidelines risk to be rejected without consideration of their merits. The deadline for submitting papers is 18 August 2019 (11:59 p.m. American Samoa time).

The authors of accepted papers must guarantee that their papers will be presented at the conference.